Archive for November 2012

The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities   1 comment

“The world is becoming more global and more urban, and airports are key to its connective fiber. John Kasarda and Greg Lindsay argue that airports underpin a whole new aerotropolis model for economic development that is reshaping economic growth and development in ways that are similar to what the automobile did in the last century, and railroads and waterways did before that. As I wrote here on Atlantic Cities in May, airports indeed have huge influence on urban economic development: they have similar impacts as that of high-skilled college grads (a factor that economists suggest is central to national as well as urban growth), as well as the even larger impact of the high-tech industry.”

 

AN : Richard Florida writes deeply on matters related to cities and their growth and liveability. The role that airports play in that civic structure he defines as an aerotopolis. I grew up in Vancouver, whose local International Airport has had a huge impact on the city. Indeed, YVR has been rated as the top North American Airport for three consecutive years now. It is listed as the 9th in the top ten airports in the world  :http://www.yvr.ca/en/Airmail-articles/2012-05/Skytrax.aspx

Humanity is inherently social… video conferencing aside…people and their communities will be affected by the access and availability to air travel….

http://goo.gl/3ikQy

via The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted November 14, 2012 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Aerotropolis

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The Renaissance man: how to become a scientist over and over again | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine   Leave a comment

“Erez Lieberman Aiden is a talkative witty fellow, who will bend your ear on any number of intellectual topics. Just don’t ask him what he does. “This is actually the most difficult question that I run into on a regular basis,” he says. “I really don’t have anything for that.”

It is easy to understand why. Aiden is a scientist, yes, but while most of his peers stay within a specific field – say, neuroscience or genetics – Aiden crosses them with almost casual abandon. His research has taken him across molecular biology, linguistics, physics, engineering and mathematics. He was the man behind last year’s “culturomics” study, where he looked at the evolution of human culture through the lens of four per cent of all the books ever published. Before that, he solved the three-dimensional structure of the human genome, studied the mathematics of verbs, and invented an insole called the iShoe that can diagnose balance problems in elderly people. “I guess I just view myself as a scientist,” he says.”

AN: although the profile of Erez is from last year, nonetheless, it is still highly  inspiring. All of us  can expand our own particular fields of interest by taking a multi / cross/ inter- diciplinary approach to our questionings. The TED talk with Erez and his colleague ,Jean-Baptiste Michel , in 2011 is insightful and delightful !

http://goo.gl/Bfkwo

via The Renaissance man: how to become a scientist over and over again | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine.

Thought Leadership: Become a World-Changing Thought Leader   Leave a comment

All CEOs lead their companies: that’s line No. 1 in the job description. But only a small subset also lead their industries and the wider world toward new visions and potentially brighter futures.

Stern & Associates, a Cranford, New Jersey public-relations firm whose clients include uber-visionary Clayton Christensen, advises business leaders who want to become known as thought leaders.

Inc. editor-at-large Leigh Buchanan spoke to the firm’s group vice president Ned Ward about how he advises clients to think big–and put it out there. 

Define thought leader.

I would define a thought leader as someone who stands above subject-matter expertise and is an authority in their field. And they have to be able to prove that expertise with a track record. Think of it this way: subject-matter expertise resides within a company. Thought leadership resides within an industry. Thought leaders provide clarity, especially to industries that are in flux. They teach. And they have more ambitious goals. Thought leaders want to start a movement. Change the world.

AN : a leader on Thought Leadership…..

http://goo.gl/Mvcxz

via Thought Leadership: Become a World-Changing Thought Leader | Inc.com.

Posted November 9, 2012 by arnoneumann in Thinking, Thought Leader

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What is the Fiscal Cliff? And How It Can Drive America into Recession | Kapitall   Leave a comment

“Now that President Obama has won a second term in office, the attention of Wall Street has immediately turned onto the looming fiscal cliff. To underline the importance of the issue, asset manager Blackrock along with several other state pension boards took out full page advertisements on the eve of the election in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Washington Post to warn of the impending disaster.

Furthermore, on October 18, CEOs of major banks including JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs and Bank of America, signed an open letter pressing Congress and the President to “reach a bipartisan deal to avoid” the looming fiscal cliff. As it stands, should current laws stay exactly the same going into 2013, commentators are almost certain that the fiscal cliff will bring about another recession in the United States.

 

Just what is this fiscal cliff, and why is it so important for investors?

Essentially, the fiscal cliff represents a series of fiscal stimulus that will expire on the stroke of midnight on Dec 31, 2012. The four main drivers of the fiscal cliff are 1) the expiry of the Bush tax cuts, 2) expiry of the payroll tax cut, 3) ending of the emergency unemployment compensation passed in 2008 and 4) automatic budget cuts due to the Budget Control Act.

The expiry of the package of tax cuts, spending stimulus, and emergency benefits will all occur in 2013 and it is expected to contract the economy immediately by more than US$500 billion (>3% of GDP), almost guaranteeing the end of the economic recovery and ushering in a new recession.

AN : so the question in bold is a question which leads one to think. And questions demand answers. And answers take thoughts turned into words. But for the ” Ah Ha ! Eureka moment ” to strike …the picture settles the matter. Those little projections on top there…those are people….and people…that is a loooong way down from the cliff……

http://goo.gl/8Qgjx

via What is the Fiscal Cliff? And How It Can Drive America into Recession | Kapitall.

Posted November 7, 2012 by arnoneumann in Economic, Visualization

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London’s Raucous Babble of Languages -The Atlantic Cities   Leave a comment

“Attention, London residents: If your Malay is feeling rusty and in need of conversational oil, try heading to the neighborhood just north of Kensington Gardens. That’s where Austronesians are chatting up a storm, according to this fascinating map of London’s languages.

The clamorous cartography is the result of nifty computer analysis by Ed Manley and James Cheshire, both students at the University College London. (You might recall Cheshire from his map of London last names.) They used a tweaked Google Chrome algorithm to examine more than 3 million tweets sent by London inhabitants this summer. By the end of their dogged data-sifting, they had detected more than 60 languages including Tamil, Maltese, Tibetan, Urdu and Afrikaans.

With the help of geolocation, they then plotted the 10 most frequently spoken languages to create the colorful and informative metropolis you see below (interactive version here):

http://goo.gl/jZEO6

AN : an interesting application …. how do we see cities ? Depending on what overlay of criteria , you might be quite surprised what you find.

via London’s Raucous Babble of Languages – Neighborhoods – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted November 5, 2012 by arnoneumann in Cities, Language, London, Mapping

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Elon Musk’s Mission to Mars   Leave a comment

“When a man tells you about the time he planned to put a vegetable garden on Mars, you worry about his mental state. But if that same man has since launched multiple rockets that are actually capable of reaching Mars—sending them into orbit, Bond-style, from a tiny island in the Pacific—you need to find another diagnosis. That’s the thing about extreme entrepreneurialism: There’s a fine line between madness and genius, and you need a little bit of both to really change the world.

All entrepreneurs have an aptitude for risk, but more important than that is their capacity for self-delusion. Indeed, psychological investigations have found that entrepreneurs aren’t more risk-tolerant than non-entrepreneurs. They just have an extraordinary ability to believe in their own visions, so much so that they think what they’re embarking on isn’t really that risky. They’re wrong, of course, but without the ability to be so wrong—to willfully ignore all those naysayers and all that evidence to the contrary—no one would possess the necessary audacity to start something radically new.

I have never met an entrepreneur who fits this model more than Elon Musk. All of the entrepreneurs I admire most—Musk, Jeff Bezos, Reed Hastings, Jack Dorsey, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and a few others—have sought not just to build great companies but to take on problems that really matter. Yet even in this class of universe-denters, Musk stands out. After cofounding a series of Internet companies, including PayPal, the South African transplant could simply have retired to enjoy his riches. Instead he decided to disrupt the most difficult-to-master industries in the world. At 41 he is reinventing the car with Tesla, which is building all-electric vehicles in a Detroit-scale factory. (Wired profiled this venture in issue 18.10.) He is transforming energy with SolarCity, a startup that leases solar-power systems to homeowners.”

AN : this profile of a contemporary, extraordinary entrepreneur has inspiration and insight that will be worthwhile to read in full . May we all be inwardly driven to achieve to our own highest potential !

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/10/ff-elon-musk-qa/

via Elon Musk’s Mission to Mars | Wired Science | Wired.com.

Mind Twisting Futuristic Holographic Light Sculptures   Leave a comment

“Artist and light sculpture pioneer Makoto Tojiki is one of the most brilliant sculptures in modern day. He mainly works with light, and what fits better in a futuristic home than a couple of innovative light sculptures, right? His artwork, called No Shadow, has become a viral sensation and can only be described as a cord carbon copy of the holographic system. Standing at a distance will make it appear as such, and even if you walk up to it to take a closer look, you will be amazed by the accuracy that Makoto managed to implement into his sculptures with just a few lights.”

AN : the intersection and integration of Art, Light and Technology are vividly displayed here.

http://goo.gl/3H8Qg

via Mind Twisting Futuristic Holographic Light Sculptures.

Posted November 3, 2012 by arnoneumann in art, Light, Technology

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