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Dancing drones in the night sky | All media content | DW.DE | 21.01.2015   Leave a comment

EUROMAXX

Dancing drones in the night sky

The Ars Electronica Future Lab has been attaching LED’s to small drones and sending them up in the sky to produce intriguing light shows that are causing quite a stir on the ground below. Some people even swear they’re watching flying saucers.

 

Dancing drones in the night sky | All media content | DW.DE | 21.01.2015.

Posted January 25, 2015 by arnoneumann in Drones, Light, Public Art

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SPARKED: A Live Interaction Between Humans and Quadcopters – YouTube   Leave a comment

SPARKED: A Live Interaction Between Humans and Quadcopters – YouTube.

“Cirque du Soleil :

SPARKED: A Live Interaction Between Humans and Quadcopters

Published on 22 Sep 2014

Cirque du Soleil, ETH Zurich, and Verity Studios have partnered to develop a short film featuring 10 quadcopters in a flying dance performance. The collaboration resulted in a unique, interactive choreography where humans and drones move in sync. Precise computer control allows for a large performance and movement vocabulary of the quadcopters and opens the door to many more applications in the future.

AND …….SPARKED: Behind the Technology: http://youtu.be/7YqUocVcyrE  “

Posted January 5, 2015 by arnoneumann in art, Cirque du Soleil, creativity, Culture, Drones

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Loving Vincent van Gogh | All media content | DW.DE | 24.12.2014   Leave a comment

“Loving Vincent van Gogh

The world’s first feature-length painted animated film is being made in Poland, bringing Vincent Van Gogh paintings to life. “Loving Vincent” secured enough crowd funding cash to make it happen. Every frame of the film is an oil painting on canvas, using the very same technique in which Vincent himself painted to show the painter’s life.” …..click on the link to see the video on the story and the way the movie is being made…..

http://dw.de/p/1E9VL

Loving Vincent van Gogh | All media content | DW.DE | 24.12.2014.

Posted December 24, 2014 by arnoneumann in art, Arts & Culture, Vincent van Gogh

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Gehry on Cones, Domes and Messiness – Video – NYTimes.com   Leave a comment

Architect Frank Ghery on the planned 450,000 sq. ft. Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Link has video.

Gehry on Cones, Domes and Messiness – Video – NYTimes.com.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/bcvideo/1.0/iframe/embed.html?videoId=100000003268745&playerType=embed

Posted December 12, 2014 by arnoneumann in architecture, Frank Ghery

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New Dioramas | Sohei NISHINO in London | deconarch.com   Leave a comment

“The Diorama Maps project is a joyous mixture of photography and cartography, inspired in part by the 18th century Japanese map-maker Ino Tadataka. To make his “Diorama Maps,” Sohei Nishino spends months in a city, exploring its many vantage points. During this time he shoots thousands of pictures, which he then painstakingly hand-prints, trims to size, and compiles into huge tableaux collages from which he issues the limited edition photographic prints in two sizes. The effect is not a traditional bird’s-eye view but a wonderfully fragmented, enlightened way of seeing three dimensions in one plane.”

New Dioramas | Sohei NISHINO in London | deconarch.com.

Posted December 11, 2014 by arnoneumann in architecture, art, Dioramas

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Moscow′s city architecht | All media content | DW.DE | 15.11.2014   Leave a comment

Moscow′s city architecht | All media content | DW.DE | 15.11.2014.

http://www.dw.de/embed/320/av-18067456

http://www.dw.de/embed/320/av-18067456

Posted November 16, 2014 by arnoneumann in Architects, architecture, Moscow, Russia

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1838: The first photograph of a human being…(credit Mashable )   1 comment

1838: The first photograph of a human being.

1838

The first photograph of a human being

by Amanda Uren

This picture, the earliest known photograph to include a recognizable human form, was taken in Paris, France, in 1838 by Louis Daguerre. The human in question is standing in the bottom-left of the photograph, on the pavement by the curve in the road.  He is having his boots shined.

1838

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

I have seized the light. I have arrested its flight.
LOUIS DAGUERRE, 1839

The exposure time for the image was around seven minutes, and although the street would have been busy with traffic and pedestrians, it appears deserted. Everything moving was too fast to register on the plate.

The exception is the man at the lower-left who sat still long enough to appear in the photograph. The person cleaning his boots is also visible, although not as distinctly.

It has been speculated that instead of a shoeshine boy, the man stood at a a pump. However, comparison with another image taken by Daguerre of the same spot at noon reveals boxes used to hold brushes and polishes.

Like every Daguerreotype — the first publicly announced photographic process, and named after Daguerre — the photograph was a mirror image.  Here is the image reversed back to show the view as Daguerre saw it:

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

The street is the Boulevard du Temple, part of a fashionable area of shops, cafés and theaters. It was nicknamed the “Boulevard du Crime” because of the many crime melodramas playing in its theaters. It later lost many of these when Baron Haussmann, under the instructions of Napoleon III, remodeled and modernized Paris, removing the narrow, dark and dangerous streets of the medieval city and replacing them with parks and open spaces. This process began in 1853.

While the man having his boots shined and the person doing the shining are the most recognizable human figures, a very detailed examination of the photograph reveals other possible people:

The man having his boots shined, and the person doing the shining

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

Two women and a cart or pram near the shoeshine boy

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

A child’s face in the window of the white building

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

A child and a dog, on the opposite side of the street

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

Vaguer images of other people, also on the other side of the street

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

…and also the image of a rug hanging from a balcony

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

These ephemeral figures are hard to see because the original image photographic plate itself measured only 6.5 inches by 8.5 inches.

Posted November 5, 2014 by arnoneumann in History, Photography

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Soaring eagle captures breathtaking images | All media content | DW.DE | 25.10.2014   Leave a comment

Soaring eagle captures breathtaking images | All media content | DW.DE | 25.10.2014.

http://www.dw.de/embed/640/av-18020470

Posted October 25, 2014 by arnoneumann in Eagles, Environment

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Enya – The Song Of The Sandman (Lullaby) – YouTube   Leave a comment

Enya – The Song Of The Sandman (Lullaby) – YouTube.

“Can you hear the night’s deep song?
All the shadows say
Telling you when you’re asleep,
Tears will fade away
Dream of morning’s golden light
When you and I will leave the night …

And when the moon is high and bright,
Stars will shine on you

Dream of morning’s golden light
When you and I will leave the night …

Make a wish and when you close your eyes
I will come to you

Dream of morning’s golden light
When you and I will leave the night …

Make a wish and when you close your eyes
I will come to you……”

Posted October 18, 2014 by arnoneumann in Enya, Music Video, Music with Meaning

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The Greatest Maps in History, Collected in One Fantastic Book | WIRED   Leave a comment

The Greatest Maps in History, Collected in One Fantastic BookThe Greatest Maps in History, Collected in One Fantastic Book | WIRED.

Maps are more than a measure of space; they are also records of how humans have understood, examined, and reconsidered the earth throughout history. In his new book, Great Maps, Jerry Brotton uses over 60 milestones to guide us through our cartographic heritage.

“A map is about space, but it is also an object in time,” said Brotton, a professor of Renaissance studies at Queen Mary College in London. They tell stories: how far-reaching the borders were of a great civilization, or what another culture believed about Earth’s place in the cosmos. For Brotton, some of the most fascinating map stories are about how humans have solved complex cartographic problems.

For instance, measuring space is an innovation we often take for granted, but it was a problem solved over great swaths of time and in several different cultures. No matter when or where they were born, sailors have always needed tools to help them travel safely from one place to another, and this has consistently been one of the biggest motivators for creating accurate methods of measurement. In the west, this evolved with Ptolemaic lines of latitude and longitude, compasses, and lines of bearing like those in the Carte Pisan (image 11 in the gallery). Other cultures had their own, no less ingenious ways of solving the challenges of ocean navigation, such as the stick charts that Pacific Islanders used to colonize hundreds of remote islands (image 5).

Brotton explains that he took special care in choosing the maps in his book so he could emphasize the importance of these stories. “When you make a book called Great Maps, there is a central spine of maps that people in the field expect to see,” he explains, listing Ptolemy‘s and Mercator‘s maps as canonical examples. “But alongside those I wanted to tell other stories,” he says. In this a way, Great Maps is a broader, illustrated successor to Brotton’s last book of cartographic history, A History of the World in 12 Maps. The recurring theme in both is that maps, in a addition to showing geographic information, also betray the values and biases of their makers.

“European maps are known for being more objective and scientific than the other great mapping cultures,” he said, which is a by-product of the European nations’ colonial ambitions. “But Islamic culture was much less concerned with colonizing new territory, and their maps emphasize a consolidation of the empire and its cultural ideas.” Similarly, Chinese and Korean cultures were relatively insular, and their maps tend to focus on cultural harmony. Because the landscape was believed to affect this harmony, those cultures’ maps paid special attention to the arrangement of rivers and other natural features, Brotton says.

Each culture had its own word for these tools that look at the world from above. In the West, ‘map,’ comes from the Latin ‘mappa,’ which means cloth or napkin. In Arabic a map is ‘surah’ —a figure—and in Chinese it’s ‘tu’—usually meaning a diagram. “All these words describe slightly different manifestations of what we in the modern west designate as a map,” he said. “And, they’re all connected to how those cultures view the world.” “

Posted October 13, 2014 by arnoneumann in History, Maps

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