Archive for the ‘aerospace’ Category

NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet | NASA   Leave a comment

 

NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet | NASA.

” NASA’s “Global Selfie” Earth mosaic contains more than 36,000 individual photographs from the more than 50,000 images posted around the world on Earth Day, April 22, 2014.
Image Credit:
NASA
May 22, 2014
Facinating nd ambitious creative Project by NASA to coincide with Earth Day.
RELEASE 14-147
NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet

For Earth Day this year, NASA invited people around the world to step outside to take a “selfie” and share it with the world on social media. NASA released Thursday a new view of our home planet created entirely from those photos.

The “Global Selfie” mosaic was built using more than 36,000 individual photographs drawn from the more than 50,000 images tagged #GlobalSelfie and posted on or around Earth Day, April 22, on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and Flickr. The project was designed to encourage environmental awareness and recognize the agency’s ongoing work to protect our home planet.

Selfies were posted by people on every continent and 113 countries and regions, from Antarctica to Yemen, Greenland to Guatemala, and Pakistan to Peru. The resulting global mosaic is a zoomable 3.2-gigapixel image that users can scan and explore to look at individual photos. The Global Selfie was assembled after several weeks of collecting and curating the submitted images.

“With the Global Selfie, NASA used crowd-sourced digital imagery to illustrate a different aspect of Earth than has been measured from satellites for decades: a mosaic of faces from around the globe,” said Peg Luce, deputy director of the Earth Science Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Washington. “We were overwhelmed to see people participate from so many countries. We’re very grateful that people took the time to celebrate our home planet together, and we look forward to everyone doing their part to be good stewards of our precious Earth.”

The GigaPan image of Earth is based on views of each hemisphere captured on Earth Day 2014 by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite. Suomi NPP, a joint mission between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, collects data on both long-term climate change and short-term weather conditions.

The Global Selfie mosaic and related images and videos are available at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1n4y8qp

The Global Selfie is part of a special year for NASA Earth science. For the first time in more than a decade, five NASA Earth Science missions are scheduled to launch in one year. The Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory, a joint mission with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, was launched in February. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 is set to launch in July with the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to follow in November. And two Earth science instruments — RapidScat and the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System — will be launched to the International Space Station.

NASA missions have helped identify thousands of new planets across the universe in recent years, but the space agency studies no planet more closely than our own. With 17 Earth-observing satellites in orbit and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns, NASA produces data that help scientists get a clearer picture of Earth’s interconnected natural systems. The agency shares this unique knowledge with the global community and works with institutions in the United States and around the world that contribute to understanding and protecting our home planet.

For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities in 2014, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

-end-

Steve Cole
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0918
stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov “

Posted May 24, 2014 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Photography

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Why NASA Made a Movie You Can’t Watch at Home – Rebecca J. Rosen – The Atlantic   Leave a comment

 

Why NASA Made a Movie You Can’t Watch at Home – Rebecca J. Rosen – The Atlantic.

Water Falls is a beautiful combination of science and art. But to see it, you’ll need some pretty special equipment.

Posted January 23, 2014 by arnoneumann in aerospace, art, NASA, Science

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The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities   1 comment

“The world is becoming more global and more urban, and airports are key to its connective fiber. John Kasarda and Greg Lindsay argue that airports underpin a whole new aerotropolis model for economic development that is reshaping economic growth and development in ways that are similar to what the automobile did in the last century, and railroads and waterways did before that. As I wrote here on Atlantic Cities in May, airports indeed have huge influence on urban economic development: they have similar impacts as that of high-skilled college grads (a factor that economists suggest is central to national as well as urban growth), as well as the even larger impact of the high-tech industry.”

 

AN : Richard Florida writes deeply on matters related to cities and their growth and liveability. The role that airports play in that civic structure he defines as an aerotopolis. I grew up in Vancouver, whose local International Airport has had a huge impact on the city. Indeed, YVR has been rated as the top North American Airport for three consecutive years now. It is listed as the 9th in the top ten airports in the world  :http://www.yvr.ca/en/Airmail-articles/2012-05/Skytrax.aspx

Humanity is inherently social… video conferencing aside…people and their communities will be affected by the access and availability to air travel….

http://goo.gl/3ikQy

via The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted November 14, 2012 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Aerotropolis

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Skydive from space recreated in LEGO | Grist   Leave a comment

Skydive from space recreated in LEGO

By Jess Zimmerman

We wrote about Felix Baumgartner’s planned freefall from the edge of space last week, but the first attempt ended up being called off due to winds. He pulled it off over the weekend, though, falling for over four minutes and achieving supersonic speed. If you missed the jump, which sponsor Red Bull swears will have scientific validity but which will probably most serve to make people gasp and then feel depressed about the state of our public-sector space program, you can see it recreated at 1 to 350 ”

AN : this article from GRIST captures ,with the videos, both the real dive and the unreal dive (LEGO re-creation ). Either way, a superb accomplishment !

http://goo.gl/UB4R5

via Skydive from space recreated in LEGO | Grist.

Posted October 16, 2012 by arnoneumann in aerospace, LEGO

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BBC News – Saving lives from space   Leave a comment

Saving lives from space

“From Hurricane Katrina to the Japanese tsunami – satellite images are increasingly playing an important role during rescue efforts after natural or man-made disasters. The images, often taken minutes after devastation has occurred, help pinpoint people and places at risk.A formal system of sharing information by space agencies was agreed in 1999, with the creation of the Disasters Charter. Since then, the charter has helped provide data for more than 300 disasters, in more than 100 countries.Here – to mark World Space Week 2012 – Dr Alice Bunn from the UK Space Agency looks at how the images, taken many hundreds of miles above the planet, are being used to save lives.”

Continue reading the main story & the six minute video with stunning visuals & examples of employment of the satellites under the Disaster Charter mechanism of International collaboration.

via BBC News – Saving lives from space.

United Completes First Commercial Biofuel Powered Flight   Leave a comment

United Airlines just announced that Flight 1403, scheduled to take off today, Monday November 7th will be powered by Solazyme’s algae-derived biofuel. This will be the world’s first commercial biofuel powered flight. The flight’s route, from Houston to Chicago, is significant in several ways. First, the departure from Houston can be taken to symbolize a departure from the  ”big oil” that Houston has come to represent. Second, it represents a full merging of United and Continental. The flight will be traveling from Continental’s hub in Houston to United’s hub in Chicago. Continental pilots will be manning the cockpit of the United 737-800 Eco-Skies aircraft.The fuel, branded Solafuel, is a 40/60 blend of algae-based fuel and traditional petroleum-based jet fuel that was produced by a partnership between Solazyme and UOP.Back in February, Solazyme announced a partnership with Qantas to provide biofuel to the Australian carrier, but United has beaten them to the punch with the first commercial flight. Solazyme was also the first company to produce an algae-derived jet fuel that met FAA specifications. In what is certain to become a major new industry, a major competitor has emerged in Sapphire Energy, which was named one of the top ten green startups of 2010, receiving more than $100 million in venture capital funding.Other players in this new field that were also spotlighted at last week’s Algal Biofuels Organization ABO Summit in Minneapolis include Phycal, BioProcess Algae, Heliae and Algenol.Two years ago, Continental Airlines launched the first US biofuel test flight, also from Houston, burning a blend of 50 percent standard aviation fuel, 3 percent algae-based fuel from Sapphire also partnering with UOP and 47 percent jatropha oil. A month earlier, Air New Zealand ran a test flight using 50/50 jet fuel and jatropha oil. Some consider jatropha, a tropical succulent, a promising jet fuel alternative, but concerns have been raised about the amount of water required to grow it, which is said to be five times more than corn or sugar cane.Meanwhile, Solazyme is producing not only oil, but also food, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Last month they announced an expanded agreement with Unilever to produce algae-derived oils for making soap and other personal care products, presumably, to cut back on the use of palm oil and petroleum-derived components.A week later, their Solazyme Roquette Nutritionals subsidiary announced that it will begin producing its microalgae derived food ingredient, Whole Algalin Flour, at Roquette’s commercial production plant in Lestrem, France.Writing about the ABO conference, biofuels analyst Jim Lane says, “It could be that biofuels, renewable chemicals and materials have an overly complicated and wrongly-told story. What investors have been trained to think is that “green” equals “higher costs,” [meaning it] is a luxury, requires subsidies, and is currently unaffordable. Their belief: carbon mitigation is a cost that will be saddled on the hard-pressed and possibly unemployed consumer. They have come to believe that renewables equal subsidies… The message of the industry’s current investors to the world: the military should provide the capital for renewable diesel, that airlines should build out aviation biofuels, that governments need to provide incentives, tax credits, mandates and tariffs for the development at scale of everything else. And that anything not already paid for by any of the above should be paid for by oil companies, who apparently should be delighted at the opportunity to invest in putting themselves out of business.”RP Siegel, PE, is the President of Rain Mountain LLC. He is also the co-author of the eco-thriller Vapor Trails, the first in a series covering the human side of various sustainability issues including energy, food, and water.  Like airplanes, we all leave behind a vapor trail. And though we can easily see others’, we rarely see our own.

via United Completes First Commercial Biofuel Powered Flight.

Posted November 12, 2011 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Biofuel, Environment, Green

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Boeing Wins FAA Certification for 747-8 Freighter – Bloomberg   1 comment

Big planes are big business. Innovation and different market needs for paasenger and freight keep this sector of the global economy  bouyant.

“Boeing Co. (BA)’s new 747-8 freighter won certification from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to enter commercial service, capping a two-year, $2.04 billion delay for the company’s biggest plane ever.

Luxembourg’s Cargolux Airlines International SA will receive the first of the jumbo jets early next month, Boeing said today in a statement. The European Aviation Safety Agency also gave its approval to the new plane, Boeing said.”

via Boeing Wins FAA Certification for 747-8 Freighter – Bloomberg.

Posted August 19, 2011 by arnoneumann in aerospace

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