Archive for the ‘Geopolitics’ Category

What we can do to bring down dictators | Carne Ross | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk   Leave a comment

A significant question. Does an individual make a difference ? How and what can be done outside of the role of governments and World Organizations?

“How might outsiders help fight dictators? As protesters fight dictators across the Middle East, people outside are asking what they can do to help.

Traditionally, we tend to look to our own governments to act. As Gaddafi’s repression of pro-democracy rebels mounted in Libya, campaigners demanded sanctions and, as the attacks intensified, military intervention. But both forms of government pressure have serious drawbacks and, too often, come very late in reaction to gross repression. In Darfur, for example, sanctions on Khartoum were not imposed until many thousands had died.

Thanks to the threat of a Russian and Chinese veto, the UN security council has yet to respond to the murder of the Syrian people by their government, although both the US and EU have imposed their own, limited, sanctions. And no amount of signatures on online petitions is likely to budge it.

Revolutionaries in Egypt and Tunisia shared advice (translated by the Atlantic) on nonviolent techniques to confront the authorities. This manual drew on Gene Sharp’s brilliantly concise yet comprehensive list of nonviolent actions to defeat tyranny (available as a downloadable pdf). And for an excellent scholarly review of civil resistance, Adam Roberts and Timothy Garton Ash have assembled a collection of fascinating essays analysing nonviolent action in many different countries, including Gandhi’s campaign against imperial rule in India and the overthrow of Milosevic in Serbia. But these examples are about resistance inside the country concerned, not about what outsiders can do.

Are there other tools to assist those fighting for democracy? When the Libya crisis broke, I suggested ten nonviolent ways to stop Gaddafi. Former diplomat that I am, these suggestions, too, tended to ask for government action. That episode, however, and the feeling of horrible impotence watching Bashar al-Assad slaughter his own people in Syria, has set me wondering what else can be done beyond merely asking our governments to act.”

via What we can do to bring down dictators | Carne Ross | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk.

Posted June 26, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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SCO vs Bilderberg: Where are the real decisions being made? | Asia |Axisoflogic.com   Leave a comment

 

 

“As the Western elite gathered in picturesque St Moritz to grapple with pressing world crises, the outsiders met in the bleak steppes of Central Asia.

Last week’s 10th Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) summit in the Kazakh capital Astana highlighted how the major rivals to empire, led by Russia and China — themselves rivals, are trying to fashion an alternative to US hegemony.”

via SCO vs Bilderberg: Where are the real decisions being made? | Asia |Axisoflogic.com.

Thought provoking article on some key International relations in trade and power.

Posted June 25, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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BRICS: The New Great Game   Leave a comment

 

 

The increasing role and importance of China within the Brazil Russia India CHina South Africa (BRICS) trading group .

“South Africa’s entry into BRICS represents a diplomatic coup for China. By roping South Africa into the group, China is trying to undercut the relevance of the IBSA Dialogue Forum (with India, Brazil and South Africa as members) that aims to promote South-South cooperation among democracies. South Africa knows that despite having more in common with India, China may ultimately hold more economic and political clout. Trade between China and South Africa was $25.6 billion in 2010, making China South Africa’s largest trading partner, and South Africa China’s second largest partner in Africa. In contrast, in 2009-2010, India-South Africa trade was just $7.73 billion. Chinese investments in South Africa also provide far more jobs than Indian ones, and China’s backing can further South African interests in forums like the UNSC.”

via BRICS: The New Great Game.

Posted June 25, 2011 by arnoneumann in BRICS, China, Geopolitics

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The Poor Will Inherit the Earth – By Uri Dadush and William Shaw | Foreign Policy   Leave a comment

The global economy is being reshaped. Besides economic ascent, there is a skewing of the impact to climate change . Growth can bring properity but tensions as well. Read in full.

“A generation ago, developing countries only hit the economic headlines when a Latin American country defaulted or a Saudi minister announced a new oil price target. The Soviet empire still lorded over Eastern Europe; China and India remained largely closed to the world; and conflict, disease, and corrupt regimes kept sub-Saharan Africa’s population mired in poverty and economic isolation. But today, developing countries are propelling the world economy.”

via The Poor Will Inherit the Earth – By Uri Dadush and William Shaw | Foreign Policy.

Posted June 20, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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Understanding China Through the Ancient Game of Wei Qi, or Go – WSJ.com   Leave a comment

“A 2,000-year-old board game holds the key to understanding how the Chinese really think—and U.S. officials had better learn to play if they want to win the real competition.

That’s the pitch that David Lai, a professor at the Army War College, has been making in recent months to senior military officials in the U.S. and overseas. Learning the ancient board game of wei qi, known in the U.S. as Go, can teach non-Chinese how to see the geostrategic “board” the same way that Chinese leaders do, he says.”

 

via Understanding China Through the Ancient Game of Wei Qi, or Go – WSJ.com.

Posted June 12, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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The Ants and the Grasshoppers   Leave a comment

The Ants and the Grasshoppers.

“Miguel Silva observes that strategic ambiguity on the part of traditional greater powers compels middle powers to seize the initiative.”

…”So while Western Europe was occupied with frivolous pursuits of universal jurisdiction or effective democratic development models for Africa, Eastern Europe has been engaged in a tense competition with Russia, for geopolitical safety.

While America focused on making the world safe for democracy, the Middle East was bridled with new initiatives aiming at regional supremacy.

While South America played with sterile models of regional unity, Africa was invaded by the big Asian powers.”

 

Posted June 12, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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Power Implications of the 21st Century Economy – Carnegie Endowment for International Peace   Leave a comment

“Within a generation, developing countries will likely account for six of the world’s seven largest economies and dominate world trade. How will this affect international relations and governance in the context of globalization?

To discuss these issues, Carnegie will host a distinguished panel of experts, including Carnegie’s Uri Dadush and William Shaw; Brookings’s Kemal Derviş, former head of the United Nations Development Programme; and the Rt. Hon. Mike Moore, the current ambassador and former prime minister of New Zealand as well as former director-general of the World Trade Organization. Carnegie’s Moisés Naím will moderate.

The event will mark the publication of Juggernaut: How Emerging Markets Are Reshaping Globalization (Carnegie Endowment, 2011), written by Uri Dadush and William Shaw, which explores how the rise of developing countries will reshape the economic landscape.

via Power Implications of the 21st Century Economy – Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Posted June 6, 2011 by arnoneumann in Geopolitics

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