Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

1838: The first photograph of a human being…(credit Mashable )   1 comment

1838: The first photograph of a human being.

1838

The first photograph of a human being

by Amanda Uren

This picture, the earliest known photograph to include a recognizable human form, was taken in Paris, France, in 1838 by Louis Daguerre. The human in question is standing in the bottom-left of the photograph, on the pavement by the curve in the road.  He is having his boots shined.

1838

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

I have seized the light. I have arrested its flight.
LOUIS DAGUERRE, 1839

The exposure time for the image was around seven minutes, and although the street would have been busy with traffic and pedestrians, it appears deserted. Everything moving was too fast to register on the plate.

The exception is the man at the lower-left who sat still long enough to appear in the photograph. The person cleaning his boots is also visible, although not as distinctly.

It has been speculated that instead of a shoeshine boy, the man stood at a a pump. However, comparison with another image taken by Daguerre of the same spot at noon reveals boxes used to hold brushes and polishes.

Like every Daguerreotype — the first publicly announced photographic process, and named after Daguerre — the photograph was a mirror image.  Here is the image reversed back to show the view as Daguerre saw it:

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

The street is the Boulevard du Temple, part of a fashionable area of shops, cafés and theaters. It was nicknamed the “Boulevard du Crime” because of the many crime melodramas playing in its theaters. It later lost many of these when Baron Haussmann, under the instructions of Napoleon III, remodeled and modernized Paris, removing the narrow, dark and dangerous streets of the medieval city and replacing them with parks and open spaces. This process began in 1853.

While the man having his boots shined and the person doing the shining are the most recognizable human figures, a very detailed examination of the photograph reveals other possible people:

The man having his boots shined, and the person doing the shining

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

Two women and a cart or pram near the shoeshine boy

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

A child’s face in the window of the white building

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

A child and a dog, on the opposite side of the street

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

Vaguer images of other people, also on the other side of the street

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

…and also the image of a rug hanging from a balcony

IMAGE: PUBLIC DOMAIN VIA WIKIPEDIA

These ephemeral figures are hard to see because the original image photographic plate itself measured only 6.5 inches by 8.5 inches.

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Posted November 5, 2014 by arnoneumann in History, Photography

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NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet | NASA   Leave a comment

 

NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet | NASA.

” NASA’s “Global Selfie” Earth mosaic contains more than 36,000 individual photographs from the more than 50,000 images posted around the world on Earth Day, April 22, 2014.
Image Credit:
NASA
May 22, 2014
Facinating nd ambitious creative Project by NASA to coincide with Earth Day.
RELEASE 14-147
NASA Releases Earth Day “Global Selfie” Mosaic of Our Home Planet

For Earth Day this year, NASA invited people around the world to step outside to take a “selfie” and share it with the world on social media. NASA released Thursday a new view of our home planet created entirely from those photos.

The “Global Selfie” mosaic was built using more than 36,000 individual photographs drawn from the more than 50,000 images tagged #GlobalSelfie and posted on or around Earth Day, April 22, on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+ and Flickr. The project was designed to encourage environmental awareness and recognize the agency’s ongoing work to protect our home planet.

Selfies were posted by people on every continent and 113 countries and regions, from Antarctica to Yemen, Greenland to Guatemala, and Pakistan to Peru. The resulting global mosaic is a zoomable 3.2-gigapixel image that users can scan and explore to look at individual photos. The Global Selfie was assembled after several weeks of collecting and curating the submitted images.

“With the Global Selfie, NASA used crowd-sourced digital imagery to illustrate a different aspect of Earth than has been measured from satellites for decades: a mosaic of faces from around the globe,” said Peg Luce, deputy director of the Earth Science Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, Washington. “We were overwhelmed to see people participate from so many countries. We’re very grateful that people took the time to celebrate our home planet together, and we look forward to everyone doing their part to be good stewards of our precious Earth.”

The GigaPan image of Earth is based on views of each hemisphere captured on Earth Day 2014 by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite. Suomi NPP, a joint mission between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, collects data on both long-term climate change and short-term weather conditions.

The Global Selfie mosaic and related images and videos are available at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1n4y8qp

The Global Selfie is part of a special year for NASA Earth science. For the first time in more than a decade, five NASA Earth Science missions are scheduled to launch in one year. The Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory, a joint mission with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, was launched in February. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 is set to launch in July with the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to follow in November. And two Earth science instruments — RapidScat and the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System — will be launched to the International Space Station.

NASA missions have helped identify thousands of new planets across the universe in recent years, but the space agency studies no planet more closely than our own. With 17 Earth-observing satellites in orbit and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns, NASA produces data that help scientists get a clearer picture of Earth’s interconnected natural systems. The agency shares this unique knowledge with the global community and works with institutions in the United States and around the world that contribute to understanding and protecting our home planet.

For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities in 2014, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

-end-

Steve Cole
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0918
stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov “

Posted May 24, 2014 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Photography

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A new way to explore Paris: by color | CNN Travel   Leave a comment

 

Carrying on with the thread of colour theme posts :…read & see the gallery…….

A new way to explore Paris: by color | CNN Travel.

Paris colors — one photographer’s multi-hued take on the city

When Nichole Robertson relocated to Paris from New York more than four years ago, she roamed the city.

She soon hit upon a distinctive way of documenting her wanderings.

She took photos of particular colors she found popping out against that characteristic Paris gray, then went on a scavenger hunt to find where in the city those colors — a certain rust red, say, or eggshell blue — recurred.

She posted the resulting photographic series on a blog (now archived at Obvioustate.com).

The bestseller

And then the part that doesn’t usually happen: the blog went viral and led to a bestselling book, “Paris in Color.”

The images are clearly Parisian, but organized in a novel and engaging fashion.

Like so many new arrivals in Paris, Robertson at first traipsed around the city’s most popular sights, such as Notre Dame, the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe.

She noticed visitors dutifully pulling back to snap pictures of their travel companions in front of these classic attractions and then dutifully putting their cameras away.

Robertson decided to go for an opposite approach: focusing in on detail and color.

She took shots that highlighted the varying shades of brown in a row of baguettes, a bicycle saddle bag and an aged stone building façade, for example.

She focused on yellow as it cropped up in a café façade, a tart in a patisserie or flowers in a window basket.

Capture the details

“The details are the things that you will actually remember — capture those,” Robertsonadvises photographers.

She seeks out culture, bits of nature thriving in the city and moments of human interaction.

Neutral grays and browns are featured prominently in her work; bouncing against each other, they feel lively.

Robertson’s color-seeking approach is surprising, given the uniformly neutral shade that prevails in so much of Paris.

Buildings are typically off-white or gray — an ideal canvas for shocks of color, as well as the more subtle shades, she sought out.

Robertson prefers a dull, overcast sky.

When the sun is shining and the sky is blue, she puts down her camera and heads to a café.

Robertson’s project is, in a sense, all about surface — surface color — but she also feels it gives her a sense of the city’s underlying rhythms and quirks.

Shapes or theme

You needn’t just focus on a color, Robertson suggests.

Any repeating shape or theme will do.

Parisian typography, pastries or transportation methods are all good starting points for re-focusing the way you see things.

“It might seem absurd just to wander around Paris,” Robertson says, especially if you have limited time there.

But to really get to know the city she recommends choosing a particular area and doing just that, even for one day, noticing the quirks and repeating themes — and photographing them.

The same approach works equally well in many other old European cities, such as Rome.

As for Robertson, she returns again and again to Montmartre, the Left Bank, and the banks of the Seine, all of which she also documents in an iPhone app, The Paris Journals.

“Paris gets distilled down to one or two icons that don’t capture all the other equally good stuff you see,” she says.

“The good stuff is in the side streets.” “

Posted March 24, 2014 by arnoneumann in Colour, Paris, Photography

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Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris (January 29–May 4, 2014) – YouTube   Leave a comment

Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris (January 29–May 4, 2014) – YouTube.

“Widely acknowledged as one of the most talented photographers of the nineteenth century, Charles Marville (French, 1813–1879) was commissioned by the city of Paris to document both the picturesque, medieval streets of old Paris and the broad boulevards and grand public structures that Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann built in their place for Emperor Napoleon III. This exhibition presents a selection of around one hundred of his photographs.

Marville achieved moderate success as an illustrator of books and magazines early in his career. It was not until 1850 that he shifted course and took up photography—a medium that had been introduced just eleven years earlier. His poetic urban views, detailed architectural studies, and picturesque landscapes quickly garnered praise. Although he made photographs throughout France, Germany, and Italy, it was his native city—especially its monuments, churches, bridges, and gardens—that provided the artist with his greatest and most enduring source of inspiration.

By the end of the 1850s, Marville had established a reputation as an accomplished and versatile photographer. From 1862, as official photographer for the city of Paris, he documented aspects of the radical modernization program that had been launched by Emperor Napoleon III and his chief urban planner, Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann. In this capacity, Marville photographed the city’s oldest quarters, and especially the narrow, winding streets slated for demolition. Even as he recorded the disappearance of Old Paris, Marville turned his camera on the new city that had begun to emerge. Many of his photographs celebrate its glamour and comforts, while other views of the city’s desolate outskirts attest to the unsettling social and physical changes wrought by rapid modernization.

Haussmann not only redrew the map of Paris, he transformed the urban experience by commissioning and installing tens of thousands of pieces of street furniture, kiosks, and Morris columns for posting advertisements, pissoirs, garden gates, and, above all, some twenty thousand gas lamps. By the time he stepped down as prefect in 1870, Paris was no longer a place where residents dared to go out at night only if accompanied by armed men carrying lanterns. Taken as a whole, Marville’s photographs of Paris stand as one of the earliest and most powerful explorations of urban transformation on a grand scale.

By the time of his death, Marville had fallen into relative obscurity, with much of his work stored in municipal or state archives. This exhibition, which marks the bicentennial of Marville’s birth, explores the full trajectory of the artist’s photographic career and brings to light the extraordinary beauty and historical significance of his art.

http://www.CharlieRose.com

 

Posted March 18, 2014 by arnoneumann in History, Paris, Photography

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This 3200 Year Old Tree Is So Huge It’s Never Been Captured In A Single Image…Until Now. | Distractify   Leave a comment

 

This 3200 Year Old Tree Is So Huge It’s Never Been Captured In A Single Image…Until Now. | Distractify.

Posted March 17, 2014 by arnoneumann in Photography, Sequoia

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Earliest Photographic Selfie ? : Daguerreotype and Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey   Leave a comment

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daguerreotype

“The daguerreotype /dəˈɡɛrɵtp/ (Frenchdaguerréotype) process (also called daguerreotypy), introduced in 1839, was the first publicly announced photographic process and the first to come into widespread use. By the early 1860s, later processes which were less costly and produced more easily viewed images with shorter exposure times had almost entirely replaced it. A small-scale revival of daguerreotypy among photographers interested in historical processes was increasingly evident in the 1980s and 1990s and has persisted into the 2010s.”

Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

“Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (21 October 1804 – 7 December 1892) was a French photographerand draughtsman who was active in the Middle East. His daguerreotypes are the earliest surviving photographs of GreecePalestineEgyptSyria and Turkey. Remarkably, his photographs were only discovered in the 1920s in a storeroom of his estate and then only became known eighty years later.

Girault de Prangey studied painting in Paris at the École des Beaux-Arts and in 1841 he learned daguerreotypy, possibly from Louis Daguerre himself or from Hippolyte Bayard. Girault de Prangey was keenly interested in the architecture of the Middle East, and he toured Italy and the countries of the eastern Mediterranean between 1841 and 1844, producing over 900 daguerreotypes of architectural views, landscapes, and portraits.

After his return to France, Girault de Prangey made watercolour and pen-and-ink studies after his photographs and published a small-edition book of lithographs from them. He also made stereographs of his estate and the exotic plants he collected. Girault de Prangey did not exhibit or otherwise make his photographs known during his lifetime.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Prangey_portrait.jpg

File:Prangey portrait.jpg

The dangerous, beautiful life of a Lego minifig photographer | The Verge   1 comment

The dangerous, beautiful life of a Lego minifig photographer | The Verge.

“UK-based photographer Andrew Whyte specializes in dramatic light art and long exposures of the night sky, but some of his most striking work involves helping an inch-high fellow photographer get a good shot. For over a year, Whyte has been shooting what he calls the “Legography” series, starring a Lego minifig with a bulky black camera and a penchant for exploration. The minifig travels with Whyte, waiting to be posed scaling a fence, watching the sunrise, or playing tourist in London.

In order to allow for some portability and spontaneity, the Legography series is shot on an iPhone, initially the 4S and now the 5S. Whyte uses app 645 Pro to get more manual control over his shots than the default camera software would allow, then processes them in Snapseed before uploading them to theLegography Facebook page. “As an exploration of mobile photography, the project was very enlightening and quite liberating — to know I could be just about anywhere and still keep on top of things,” says Whyte. The rest of his photography can be found at Long Exposures.”

Posted March 2, 2014 by arnoneumann in LEGO, Photography, Photorealism

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