Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

World-Class Hybrid Grass for the World Cup – YouTube   Leave a comment

World-Class Hybrid Grass for the World Cup – YouTube.

” Published on 26 May 2014

May 27 (Bloomberg) — Desso Sports Systems’ “Grassmaster” is the cyborg version of soccer turf: neither natural nor artificial but a hybrid. Artificial fibers are injected into the pitch, then natural grass is planted and its roots grow entwined with the fibers, anchoring the grass. The result: a more even and durable playing field. The system has been used in the Olympics and in NFL stadiums. Now it’s been installed at the Arena de Sao Paulo — the venue for the opening match of the 2014 World Cup. (Source: Bloomberg) “

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Posted May 26, 2014 by arnoneumann in agriculture, FIFA, Sports, Technology

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New technology is changing classical music performance   1 comment

“It sometimes seems as though the world of classical music doesn’t change. Most of the music is from a canon that may be hundreds of years old; most of the time the musicians are still formally clad, the men in the evening dress of a century ago.

In one important area, however, new ways of doing things are starting to appear. Technology is changing the ways in which musicians rehearse and perform.

Pianist Kirill Gerstein sparked intermission discussions late last year when he performed Thomas Adès concerto “Seven Days” with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra using an iPad with a wireless foot pedal in lieu of a conventional score.

In an interview, Gerstein said he’s been using his iPad for 2½ years, the first, he thinks, among classical pianists. He uses it with contemporary music, where memorization is not expected, and in chamber music.

The tablet has practical advantages: It is lit, making reading it easier and eliminating concerns about lighting. It also eliminates the need for page turners. “They may turn the page too soon or too late, or make noise,” Gerstein said. “In cases like this, it is helpful to play with the iPad. I know exactly when I want to turn, and I turn it for myself.” His system has never crashed.

To do the turning, Gerstein uses a Bluetooth-enabled foot pedal called an AirTurn. He gets new scores from their publishers, or makes PDFs of older music by scanning scores from his own library.

In the case of out-of-copyright works, he recommends IMSLP.org. The International Music Score Library Project is community-sourced, like Wikipedia, and Gerstein calls it “an amazing resource.”

The site is copyright compliant, so there’s nothing from after 1923, and it’s free. “There are the most imaginable and unimaginable things,” Gerstein said. “Maybe you won’t find the edition of the Franck sonata from 1980, but you will find the original (edition) and four others. Things that used to be difficult to find are up there.”

Otherwise, Gerstein works from paper versions. “I do think it’s very important to keep buying paper versions of sheet music. We do want publishers of accurate versions around.”

With the iPad, he can tweak his scores by combining the piano part and a full orchestra score to give himself important cues. Sometimes he plays from the full score. By eliminating the white space of the margins, the notes become almost as large as in the printed score.

“Then, of course, there is the fact that I can carry a music library,” added Gerstein. “I can look at (scores) while traveling. It’s not possible with paper, just from the luggage side. Today, I decided to read the Franck sonata; it took a minute to download the score, and then I was happily playing it.”

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra section cello Bjorn Ranheim admires Gerstein’s score-on-tablet setup and wishes the SLSO could have the same.

via New technology is changing classical music performance : Entertainment.

http://goo.gl/GXVvd

AN : classical music meets new classic technology…and is all the better for it. Nice examples of how that works in the lives of several musicians and groups.

Posted February 10, 2013 by arnoneumann in music, Technology

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Tech & the City – Next American City   Leave a comment

“New York City’s tech sector might not yet be at critical mass. But it’s booming by nearly every measure. By some, it has transformed itself into a tech city second only to Silicon Valley. Research from the Center for an Urban Future found that some 486 New York City start-ups created since 2007 have gotten some form of private investment, including from angel investors or venture capitalists. The New York Tech Meetup, a monthly geek revival, regularly fills NYU’s 870-seat Skirball Center theater, with additional $10 tickets sold to watch the demos and presentations from an overflow venue. Half of the nearly 300 start-ups on a “Made in New York City” list maintained by the Meetup recently reported that they were hiring.

Cornell’s long-standing academic reputation and Technion’s proven industry expertise were no doubt appealing, says Pinsky, but what was otherwise so attractive about the bid was the schools’ embrace of what’s already taking place in New York City. “Cornell and the Technion basically asked the question the same way” as the city saw it, says Pinsky. “What they asked was, ‘What are the issues we should be tackling given the competitive advantages of the city?’” That the schools were talking about “hubs” and “connective media,” not “majors” and “computer science,” told officials that they were willing to tinker with their academic models, with New York City itself as their muse.”

AN : great, longer article about the technology Hub and growth  in NYC. Roosevelt Is. to be site for Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute, or TCII.

http://goo.gl/pg7GG

via Tech & the City – Next American City.

Posted December 5, 2012 by arnoneumann in Israel, New York, Technology

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Mind Twisting Futuristic Holographic Light Sculptures   Leave a comment

“Artist and light sculpture pioneer Makoto Tojiki is one of the most brilliant sculptures in modern day. He mainly works with light, and what fits better in a futuristic home than a couple of innovative light sculptures, right? His artwork, called No Shadow, has become a viral sensation and can only be described as a cord carbon copy of the holographic system. Standing at a distance will make it appear as such, and even if you walk up to it to take a closer look, you will be amazed by the accuracy that Makoto managed to implement into his sculptures with just a few lights.”

AN : the intersection and integration of Art, Light and Technology are vividly displayed here.

http://goo.gl/3H8Qg

via Mind Twisting Futuristic Holographic Light Sculptures.

Posted November 3, 2012 by arnoneumann in art, Light, Technology

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Transformative Technologies « ART of the STEM   Leave a comment

8 for 2050

What are some of the breakthroughs in technology that we might see, over the longer term, that might address some of our pressing issues in energy demand.

via Transformative Technologies « ART of the STEM.

Posted September 28, 2012 by arnoneumann in Innovation, Technology

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The Most Important New Technology Since the Smart Phone Arrives December 2012 – Technology Review   Leave a comment

“To understand how subtly revolutionary Leap will be, watch the video below, shot by the folks at The Verge, where you’ll also find more juicy details on the device’s specs and inner workings.”

via The Most Important New Technology Since the Smart Phone Arrives December 2012 – Technology Review.

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/428350/the-most-important-new-technology-since-the-smart/

AN : getting closer to ” The Minority Report ” computer interface experience…. a virtual touchscreen.

 

 

 

 

Posted September 2, 2012 by arnoneumann in Technology

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Minority Report at 10: a look at technology from today to 2054 — Engadget   Leave a comment

Interesting overview and backcasting look at ” The Minority Report ” film and its forward looking human – computer interaction and targeting info push technology….

“Well before filming got underway, Spielberg gathered together a team of experts from a variety of fields for a three-day think tank. That included people like virtual reality pioneer Jaron Lanier, Wired co-founder Kevin Kelly, Whole Earth Catalog and WELL founder Stewart Brand, writer Douglas Coupland, and a number of other scientists and researchers. They were tasked not only with making sure the filmmakers got things straight, but with dreaming up and thinking through much of the technology that fills the film’s universe.

The stand-out piece of technology from the movie is undoubtedly the gesture interface that’s used to interact with the “Precrime” system central to the film (more on that later).”….

via Minority Report at 10: a look at technology from today to 2054 — Engadget.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/21/minority-report-at-10-a-look-at-technology-from-today-to-2054/

 

Posted June 24, 2012 by arnoneumann in Technology

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