Archive for the ‘#africa’ Tag

IRIN Global | GLOBAL: Follow the fizz, save a life | Global | Zambia | Aid Policy | Health & Nutrition   Leave a comment

“NAIROBI, 2 March 2012 (IRIN) – How is it that the world’s most popular fizzy drink reaches even the farthest-flung corners of the planet, yet vast numbers of children in developing countries die for lack of one of the cheapest and most effective preparations known to medical science?

The world’s second-biggest cause of child mortality, diarrhoea, kills about 1.5 million children every year. Three-quarters of these deaths could be prevented with a simple course of oral rehydration salts (ORS) combined with zinc tablets, at a cost of just US$0.50 per patient.

Yet, despite being heavily promoted by the World Health Organization since the 1970s, fewer than 40 percent of child diarrhoea cases in developing countries are treated with ORS. That figure falls below 1 percent when the treatment includes zinc, which reduces not only the duration and severity of diarrhoeal episodes but also the likelihood of subsequent infections.

“The challenge is not what to do but how to deliver [ORS] at very high coverage,” Abdulai Tinorgah, who heads the UN Children’s Fund’s Child Survival and Development section in Nairobi, told IRIN.”

via IRIN Global | GLOBAL: Follow the fizz, save a life | Global | Zambia | Aid Policy | Health & Nutrition.

Posted June 29, 2012 by arnoneumann in Africa, humanity

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Africa’s Chance to Leapfrog the West – Bright B. Simons – Harvard Business Review   Leave a comment

Leapfrogging is the umbrella name for the systems available to us today that make all this possible. Cloud computing, social media, new professional paradigms such as social entrepreneurship, below-the-line marketing and a host of novel realities have transformed the global context for Africans with their eyes set on continental and beyond-continental scale…..

…..Quite clearly, while leapfrogging might contribute powerfully to hacking physical infrastructure, it is less useful when it comes to soft (cultural, social, regulatory etc.) infrastructure. Therein lies its limitation in driving the African Renaissance.

So what is my one big idea?

Leapfrogging is a set of tools and techniques, not a conceptual or ideological description of the socioeconomic evolution of Africa now or in the near future. What matters is how entrepreneurs and innovators, especially social innovators, employ this set of tools within prevailing constraints. That, and not the poetic power of a renaissance motif, will transform Africa, one entrepreneurial triumph after another.”

via Africa’s Chance to Leapfrog the West – Bright B. Simons – Harvard Business Review.

Posted February 27, 2012 by arnoneumann in Africa, Innovation

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By Barcoding Trees, Liberia Looks to Save its Rainforests by Fred Pearce: Yale Environment 360   Leave a comment

Can something as simple as barcoding enable Liberia to resume its timber trade while still protecting its forests? The system’s inventors at the British company Helveta call it “the world’s most advanced nationwide verification system for wood products.” Initially funded by USAID, the scheme has covered all the country’s commercial logged forests for the past two years.

Every tree in a forest with a logging concession must be tagged with a unique barcode. When that tree is cut, the action is recorded and new tags are attached to each log. Every log that turns up at a port has to be traceable back to a stump in a forest. It’s as simple and as foolproof as checking out at the supermarket, says Ivan Muir, the local boss of SGS, the Swiss specialists in forest certification systems who are in charge of making it happen. Muir also issues export permits for the timber — which mostly gets turned into furniture and paneling — and monitors royalty payments to the government.”

via By Barcoding Trees, Liberia Looks to Save its Rainforests by Fred Pearce: Yale Environment 360.

Posted November 27, 2011 by arnoneumann in Africa, Forestry

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Agribusiness for Africa’s Prosperity | International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)   Leave a comment

In the next 20 years, both farming and agro-industries in Africa need to undergo profound structural transformations in order to generate the jobs, incomes and food products so badly needed by the continent’s growing population. To be able to make the vital transition from the current agriculture-led growth strategy to a more prosperous agribusiness development strategy, the power of market demand will be essential to fully developing African agribusiness capacities and achieving international competitiveness.

In this seminar, Dr. Kandeh K. Yumkella, Director-General of UNIDO, will discuss strategic policy recommendations set forth in the new book “Agribusiness for Africa’s Prosperity”. John Staatz, Professor Emeritus at Michigan State University, will offer his perspective on both the challenges facing Africa’s agribusiness development, as well as the opportunities most likely to provide food, jobs and income to the millions of Africans who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods.

Copies of the book “Agribusiness for Africa’s Prosperity” will be available at the seminar. The book can also be downloaded from the UNIDO website: http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=1000076.”

via Agribusiness for Africa’s Prosperity | International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Posted October 26, 2011 by arnoneumann in Africa, agriculture

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The Paradigm Project: A Model For Getting People Excited About Uncommon Causes | Fast Company   Leave a comment

 

 

 

In the competitive space of philanthropy and philanthrocapitalism, how do you break through the clutter and get people engaged in an issue that isn’t the tug-on-your-heart-strings norm? 

This week, The Paradigm Project hopes to do just that by starting a conversation about fuel-efficient cook stoves. They hope to bring to light the issues that women in many parts of Africa face each day walking up to 15 miles to find wood to cook food with their live Woodwalk campaign. It’s a 10-day walk from San Diego to Los Angeles (October 4–13, 2011) during which a team of founders, staff, partners, and volunteers are carrying 50-pound bundles of wood on their backs replicating the trials and challenges of the women they’re working to help. At the finish line in Los Angeles on October 13th, they will construct an “African cooking experience” complete with a traditional Kenyan hut that they’ll also be cooking in along the way. 

Visitors will have an opportunity to step inside and experience the smoky hut, which is equal to smoking 40 cigarettes per day.

The Paradigm Project is utilizing five uncommon sense principals to get in front of the people whose help they need to create permanent change:

via The Paradigm Project: A Model For Getting People Excited About Uncommon Causes | Fast Company.

Results count.

The Paradigm Project has made it its mission to create a compelling experience with the Woodwalk, while engaging the local community to take action and assist in raising funds as the organization develops their work in East Africa. With these necessary elements, The Paradigm Project hopes to end open-fire cooking for 25 million people by implementing more than 5 million fuel-efficient rocket stoves before 2020.

You can learn more about the issue and The Paradigm Project’s proposed solution, which has been recognized twice by the Clinton Global Initiative, here. You can also learn more about the Woodwalk or find out how to get involved here.

Posted October 10, 2011 by arnoneumann in Africa, philanthropy

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ONE.org Africa Blog | African youth hold keys to continent’s future – Youssou N’Dour   Leave a comment

The solution to Africa lies squarely on its youth. This is according to world renown and music legend Youssou N’Dour. The Senegalese artiste, one of the greatest in the world, advises that African leaders must engage the youth if the continent is to grow.”

via ONE.org Africa Blog | African youth hold keys to continent’s future – Youssou N’Dour.

The Senegalese Grammy award-winning artiste was in Kenya last week visiting the refugee camps in Daadab in the North-Eastern Province where he called for “inadvertible and undivided focus” on the plight of children affected by the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa. More than 12 million people are in desperate need of food, water and basic sanitation.

He at the same time lauded charity organisations on the ground helping the needy starting with UNICEF.

“I am confident that humanitarian agencies are doing everything they can to reach those who need their help,” he said. “We have a responsibility to do all that we can so that every child can be reached, their immediate needs met, their health is safeguarded and that they are protected from all harm.”

He also called on African leaders to end the annual cycle of drought and disease in the region. “African nations, African figureheads and African communities, alongside other world leaders, need to prioritise lasting solutions by strengthening governance so the right investments are made in basic services, championing peace so that people are no longer forced to flee their homes and livelihoods and empowering local communities from where the process of change will emerge,” he said.”

Posted September 13, 2011 by arnoneumann in Africa

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John Kufuor helps transform Ghana into a model for African agriculture – CSMonitor.com   Leave a comment

Agriculture as a catalyst for health and social change in Ghana. An excellent prescriptive model.

“Ghana’s transformation over the past decade has made it one of the more politically stable countries in Africa, and, as President Kufuor writes, Ghana has “made some of the greatest progress in reducing hunger, poverty, and malnutrition.”

Kufuor, a recently announced recipient of the 2011 World Food Prize, served as Ghana’s democratically elected president from 2001-2009. In the opening of the report, titled “Ghana’s Transformation,” he writes, “When I became Ghana’s President in 2000, my country needed solutions for hunger, malnutrition, and a host of other problems.”

Kufuor found agriculture to be a catalyst for these solutions. Agriculture is critical to Ghana’s economy, as some 60 percent of the country’s population depends directly on rural agriculture. Kufuor’s administration worked to harness an agriculture transformation to strengthen the nation’s economy.”

via John Kufuor helps transform Ghana into a model for African agriculture – CSMonitor.com.

Posted August 3, 2011 by arnoneumann in Africa, agriculture

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