Archive for the ‘#cities’ Tag

The three most resilient cities? They’re all in Canada | Cities | theguardian.com   Leave a comment

The three most resilient cities? They’re all in Canada | Cities | theguardian.com.

” For perhaps the first time, someone has tried to qualify the resilience of cities. Grosvenor, the London-based property company led by the Duke of Westminster, analysed more than 100 independently verified data sets in order to determine two key elements of what makes a city resilient: its “vulnerability” on the one hand, and its “adaptive capacity” on the other.

Vulnerability was measured by looking at climate threats, environmental degradation (including pollution and overconsumption due to sprawl), resources (particularly access to energy), infrastructure and community cohesion. Weakness in any of those areas reduced a city’s score.

Adaptive capacity, or a city’s ability to prevent and mitigate serious threats, was a combination of governance (high value here on democracy, freedom of speech, community participation, transparency, accountability and long-term leadership vision), strong institutions, learning capacity (including good technical universities), disaster planner and finally funding (from budget to credit and access to global funding).

Rob Ford and ice storms notwithstanding, Toronto tops the list, following by Vancouver and Calgary and closely trailed by several US cities. London is 18th, suffering as Grosvenor pointed out from social tensions due to lack of affordable housing. Eight of the weakest 20 cities are in the Bric countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China, where blistering economic growth has not yet led to long-term resilience. One particularly disturbing trend is that some of the least resilient cities on the list are also the ones where the population is expected to grow fastest. “

Posted April 15, 2014 by arnoneumann in Cities, Resilience

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A City Is (Not) A Tree: New Models of Urban Space – YouTube   Leave a comment

A City Is (Not) A Tree: New Models of Urban Space – YouTube.

Cino Zucchi provides a wholly different perspective of a City……urban design and planning…….

Posted February 18, 2014 by arnoneumann in Cities, urban

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Start up Cities Infograph | Disrupt Magazine.   Leave a comment

 

Start up Cities Infograph | Disrupt Magazine..

Posted December 24, 2013 by arnoneumann in Cities

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Planning and Financing Low-Carbon, Livable Cities   Leave a comment

Planning and Financing Low-Carbon, Livable Cities.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim announced a groundbreaking new initiative to reach 300 cities in developing countries over four years to help them plan for a low-carbon future and get the needed finance flowing.
  • An estimated 6.2 billion people – two-thirds of the world’s population – will be living in cities by 2050.
  • Cities already account for about two-thirds of the world’s energy consumption and about 70 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. A low-carbon development path could help them cut global greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent.

BBC News – A Point of View: Staring at the Shard   Leave a comment

” Will Self confesses to being dazzled by the skyscrapers that dominate urban skylines, but wonders if they have overshadowed visionary dreams of making cities better places to live.It was said of the French writer Guy de Maupassant that he ate dinner in the restaurant of the Eiffel Tower every night of the week, and when asked why, replied, “Because its the only place in Paris from where you cant see the Eiffel Tower.” ”

AN : lovely little literary walk starting within  the heart of London and thenceforth into the realm of thought of architecture and the core value of living in cities. Much, much more can be said on this topic….as  residents who live in cities vary from 9% urban dwellers in Bhutan to 97% in Belgium. ( world avg 50+% ).

via BBC News – A Point of View: Staring at the Shard.

http://goo.gl/cCY51

The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities   1 comment

“The world is becoming more global and more urban, and airports are key to its connective fiber. John Kasarda and Greg Lindsay argue that airports underpin a whole new aerotropolis model for economic development that is reshaping economic growth and development in ways that are similar to what the automobile did in the last century, and railroads and waterways did before that. As I wrote here on Atlantic Cities in May, airports indeed have huge influence on urban economic development: they have similar impacts as that of high-skilled college grads (a factor that economists suggest is central to national as well as urban growth), as well as the even larger impact of the high-tech industry.”

 

AN : Richard Florida writes deeply on matters related to cities and their growth and liveability. The role that airports play in that civic structure he defines as an aerotopolis. I grew up in Vancouver, whose local International Airport has had a huge impact on the city. Indeed, YVR has been rated as the top North American Airport for three consecutive years now. It is listed as the 9th in the top ten airports in the world  :http://www.yvr.ca/en/Airmail-articles/2012-05/Skytrax.aspx

Humanity is inherently social… video conferencing aside…people and their communities will be affected by the access and availability to air travel….

http://goo.gl/3ikQy

via The Global Gateways That Connect America to the World – Commute – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted November 14, 2012 by arnoneumann in aerospace, Aerotropolis

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London’s Raucous Babble of Languages -The Atlantic Cities   Leave a comment

“Attention, London residents: If your Malay is feeling rusty and in need of conversational oil, try heading to the neighborhood just north of Kensington Gardens. That’s where Austronesians are chatting up a storm, according to this fascinating map of London’s languages.

The clamorous cartography is the result of nifty computer analysis by Ed Manley and James Cheshire, both students at the University College London. (You might recall Cheshire from his map of London last names.) They used a tweaked Google Chrome algorithm to examine more than 3 million tweets sent by London inhabitants this summer. By the end of their dogged data-sifting, they had detected more than 60 languages including Tamil, Maltese, Tibetan, Urdu and Afrikaans.

With the help of geolocation, they then plotted the 10 most frequently spoken languages to create the colorful and informative metropolis you see below (interactive version here):

http://goo.gl/jZEO6

AN : an interesting application …. how do we see cities ? Depending on what overlay of criteria , you might be quite surprised what you find.

via London’s Raucous Babble of Languages – Neighborhoods – The Atlantic Cities.

Posted November 5, 2012 by arnoneumann in Cities, Language, London, Mapping

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