Archive for the ‘#energy’ Tag

Renewables: Australia’s a land of plenty   Leave a comment

“There has never been a scientific question as to whether renewable energy could provide 100 per cent of Australia’s energy needs,” said Mr Want, who is also chief executive of energy developer Vast Solar.

“The question is whether we as a society and as a nation see value in harnessing that resource — for domestic use and for export — and whether we are prepared to demand of our leaders that they design policies to achieve those ends.”

http://goo.gl/skzO0

via Renewables: Australia’s a land of plenty.

Posted October 26, 2012 by arnoneumann in Energy, Renewables

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A Kenyan Woman Stands Up Against Massive Dam Project by Christina M. Russo: Yale Environment 360   Leave a comment

 

“Ikal Angelei is helping lead a campaign to stop construction of a major dam in Ethiopia that threatens the water supply and way of life of tens of thousands of indigenous people. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, she explains what she believes is at stake in the fight against the Gibe III dam.”

via A Kenyan Woman Stands Up Against Massive Dam Project by Christina M. Russo: Yale Environment 360.

Posted August 9, 2012 by arnoneumann in Conservation, Dam, Energy, Environment

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The Rise and Decline of Oil : Greentech Media   1 comment

When the impacts of electric and natural gas vehicles are combined with the rise of biofuels, in an environment of high prices, all against a backdrop of rising efficiency standards, it becomes clear that oil is facing significant pressures in its core market.

How oil producers will react to an eventual decrease in oil demand remains to be seen. Given how deeply many oil-producing countries rely on oil revenues to balance their books, there is little doubt that any sustained reduction in oil demand will have significant social, political and economic implications. While some may consider this a controversial thesis, the basic functioning of the market all but ensures that when substitutes emerge that can provide the same service at lower cost, consumers will respond. As energy thinker Amory Lovins is fond of pointing out, if these trends continue, oil will likely become uncompetitive even at low prices well before it becomes unavailable even at high prices.

This notwithstanding, the decline of oil is likely to be gradual, a process more like phasing one instrument out of the symphony than disbanding the orchestra altogether.

Oil will always have customers, for the simple reason that it can be refined into thousands of different products; still, it is likely that the 65 percent of it that is devoted to ground transportation will be gradually priced out of the market by the basic functioning of market competition in the decades ahead.

via Guest Post: The Rise and Decline of Oil : Greentech Media.

http://goo.gl/M52My

Posted July 26, 2012 by arnoneumann in Oil

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Bill Clinton: cutting use of natural resources would help US economy | World news | guardian.co.uk   Leave a comment

“He said that despite the failures of successive governments – including his own 1992-2000 administration in the US – to forge working treaties on climate change, and to cut greenhouse gas emissions, people should take the initiative by working together and individually to reduce their own impact on the environment. He pointed to the work of the biologist EO Wilson, whose most recent work suggests that human beings and other complex natural societies prosper through co-operation. “I believe that in a complex world … these creative networks of co-operation have to triumph over conflict-driven models,” said Clinton.”

via Bill Clinton: cutting use of natural resources would help US economy | World news | guardian.co.uk.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jul/13/bill-clinton-natural-resources-us?newsfeed=true

India plans ‘safer’ nuclear plant powered by thorium | Environment | guardian.co.uk   Leave a comment

 

 

Producing a workable thorium reactor would be a massive breakthrough in energy generation. Using thorium – a naturally occurring moderately radioactive element named after the Norse god of thunder – as a source of atomic power is not new technology. Promising early research was carried out in the US in the 1950s and 60s and then abandoned in favour of using uranium.

The pro-thorium lobby maintains this was at least partly because national nuclear power programmes in the US and elsewhere were developed with a military purpose in mind: namely access to a source of plutonium for nuclear weapons. Unlike uranium, thorium-fuelled reactors do not result in a proliferation of weapons-grade plutonium. Also, under certain circumstances, the waste from thorium reactors is less dangerous and remains radioactive for hundreds rather than thousands of years.

That is a considerable plus for governments now worried about how to deal with nuclear waste and concerned about the possibility of rogue governments or terrorists getting their hands on plutonium. Also, with the world’s supply of uranium rapidly depleting, attention has refocused on thorium, which is three to four times more abundant and 200 times more energy dense..

“Given India’s abundant supply of thorium it makes sense for her to develop thorium reactors,” said Labour peer Baroness Worthington who is patron of the Weinberg Foundation, which promotes thorium-fuelled nuclear power.

She added: “However, many of the advantages of thorium fuel are best realised with totally new reactor designs such as the molten salt reactor developed Alvin Weinberg in the 60s. I hope India will also commit to exploring this option.”

India has the world’s largest thorium deposits and with a world hungry for low-carbon energy, it has its eyes on a potentially lucrative export market for the technology. For more than three decades, India’s nuclear research programme had been subject to international sanctions since its controversial 1974 nuclear tests. But after losing its pariah status three years ago as a result of the Indo-US nuclear deal, India is keen to export indigenous nuclear technology developed in research centres such as the BARC.”

via India plans ‘safer’ nuclear plant powered by thorium | Environment | guardian.co.uk.

Posted November 1, 2011 by arnoneumann in Energy, India, Nuclear

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100 Million Smart Meters to Be Installed in Europe by 2016, but Are End-Users Engaged? : Greentech Media   Leave a comment

“Until recently, the development of the smart grid in Europe was largely centered around the integration of the significant amount of large-scale and micro renewable generation that Europe is planning to install. Currently, 10% of Europe’s power is generated from renewable sources, compared to 2.5% in the U.S., and this share is set to reach 20% by 2020.

Utilities throughout Europe are now starting to roll out smart metering as part of a European mandate to have smart meters installed in 80% of European households by 2020. On the basis of ambitious plans announced by utilities and regulators in France, Spain, the U.K. and a gradual rollout in other European member states, GTM Research forecasts an additional 100 million smart meters will be installed between now and the end of 2016. However, so far, most utilities have used advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) more with the objective of reducing operational costs and non-technical losses rather than for empowering consumers through improved access to information about their power consumption.”

 

Smart metering rollouts are not only about technology; they are also very much about the process of rollout and the level of engagement achieved with consumers. Denmark’s SEAS-NVE, for example, paid careful attention to this aspect, to the point of training installers in how to talk to customers in their homes. As a result, the utility’s complaint rates dropped significantly and customers now save an average of 16% on their power bills.

 

Rather than focusing solely on technology, the key to persistent and effective consumer engagement is the provision of clear, timely and detailed information and actionable advice, placed in the context of larger societal objectives. Lowering transaction costs for consumers and strengthening social interaction, norms and values around energy use are key levers for increasing consumer engagement that are largely underutilized by utilities and regulators.  “

via 100 Million Smart Meters to Be Installed in Europe by 2016, but Are End-Users Engaged? : Greentech Media.

Posted September 23, 2011 by arnoneumann in Energy, Europe

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Unlocking a $500 billion green industry, without government aid — Cleantech News and Analysis   Leave a comment

The Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) legislation enables property owners to accept a voluntary tax assessment as a means of repaying upfront financing of energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. Twenty-six states in the United States, along with Australia, and New Zealand, have enacted legislation enabling the secure and scalable financing PACE structure. PACE has yet to take off in the U.S. for homes because of uncertainties in the financing of the program from Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. But, the commercial side, now solidly financed, can take off.

The key motivator behind PACE is a sound one: there’s “no upfront capital cost.” No upfront capital cost was a key in unlocking the deployment of solar when, at SunEdison, I created the power purchase agreement for the solar industry.  It enabled companies like Walmart, Staples, and Whole Foods to buy energy rather than buying a solar system.  They pay for the energy used over time.  It made solar make business sense.

Now, with this business consortium, we are unlocking the financing for the deployment of 20-year old technologies like more efficient lighting, cooling and heating, and water saving toilets.

When I tell most people about this new program, the immediate reaction is, “Well that’s a no brainer.”  But simple, obvious, powerful, business-sense solutions take brains. It then becomes a “no brainer decision” for buyers creating $500 billion dollar industries.”

 

via Unlocking a $500 billion green industry, without government aid — Cleantech News and Analysis.

Posted September 22, 2011 by arnoneumann in Energy, finance

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