Archive for the ‘#innovation’ Tag

The Power Grid: From Rickety to Resilient – TIME   1 comment

In his new book Resilience, Andrew Zolli — the director of the global innovation network PopTech — uses the electrical grid as an example of a system that lacks just that. And in an increasingly interconnected world — financially, ecologically, politically — one in which small errors in one place can cascade into broader system failures, the ability to adapt, accommodate and bounce back is only going to become more important. From climate change to overpopulation to recessions, the threats facing the world are as unpredictable as they are varied — which is why we need to craft systems that are nimble, that can bend under stress rather than break.If we cannot control the volatile tides of change, we can learn to build better boats,” writes Zolli. “We can design — and redesign — organizations, institutions, and systems to better absorb disruption, operate under a wilder variety of conditions, and shift more fluidly from one circumstance to the next.” ”

via The Power Grid: From Rickety to Resilient – TIME.

http://goo.gl/lHpXM

Posted July 28, 2012 by arnoneumann in Innovation, Resilience

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The Austro-Hungarian Legacy: Creative Citizens Need Innovative Governance | Global Trends 2030   Leave a comment

“The Austro-Hungarian Empire did not collapse in 1918 because it failed to cultivate new ideas or nurture personal freedom. It was filled with expressive, entrepreneurial, and free-thinking groups. The problem was that the Habsburg political system, which for three centuries had held diverse groups together, generated remarkable wealth, and defeated foreign tyrants (notably Napoleon), failed to adjust to new demands for national independence and democratic participation. Franz-Josef served as Emperor for more than sixty years before his death in 1916, as a pious, hard-working, and fair-minded political leader. He even encouraged equality for Jews at a time of rising anti-Semitism throughout Europe. Nonetheless, the system of imperial monarchy that he directed failed to address the growing demands for independence, development, and wealth redistribution throughout his lands. Despite his efforts, he was a prisoner of a stagnant and outdated set of political institutions.

Even with the best of leaders and institutions, large societies cannot prosper if they cannot adjust to change. At the same time that the cosmopolitan city of Vienna entered a terminal crisis in 1914, much more provincial cities like Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and Cleveland led a rapid growth in American wealth and power behind their flexible political systems of governance.”

via The Austro-Hungarian Legacy: Creative Citizens Need Innovative Governance | Global Trends 2030.

http://goo.gl/XjXOk

 

Innovation is Dead. Long Live Innovation! – Forbes   Leave a comment

Keeping the concept fresh….how to keep the term innovation when it is so prolifically

 overused and loosely defined ….

Definition : “An innovation is something new or different that has been successfully brought out into the world and creates a positive impact. It can be something new or different, because most innovation is about renewal, or taking a fresh look at existing inventions or capabilities.

The key here is that it must be something that has been brought successfully out to the world; if it hasn’t, it’s probably an invention, and an innovation. Invention is about insight, while innovation is about impact.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/dell/2012/07/05/innovation-is-dead-long-live-innovation/

via Innovation is Dead. Long Live Innovation! – Forbes.

Posted July 5, 2012 by arnoneumann in Innovation

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The Top 10 Smart Cities On The Planet | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation   Leave a comment

What Smart Cities are and research on ways to make cities more integrated and efficient in their operations and design in order to manifest the best practices for delivery of information , services and liveability.

A top 10 global ranking is included :

“The term “smart cities” is a bit ambiguous. Some people choose a narrow definition–i.e. cities that use information and communication technologies to deliver services to their citizens. I prefer a broader definition: Smart cities use information and communication technologies (ICT) to be more intelligent and efficient in the use of resources, resulting in cost and energy savings, improved service delivery and quality of life, and reduced environmental footprint–all supporting innovation and the low-carbon economy.”

Elaboration in the complete article :

via The Top 10 Smart Cities On The Planet | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation.

Posted June 5, 2012 by arnoneumann in Cities, Smart Cities

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Part 1 Ward Van Duffel, LEGO Education Europe, STEM conference 2012 – YouTube   Leave a comment

 

Thinking about  thinking….creativity and the role of play in creativity….

Part 1 Ward Van Duffel, LEGO Education Europe, STEM conference 2012 – YouTube.

Posted May 2, 2012 by arnoneumann in creativity, LEGO, Thinking

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Science, Technology, and Globalization – Conference Announcements – Harvard – Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs   Leave a comment

This upcoming conference  highlights the major and longer impact a Thinker can have on future  thinking.

“The conference coincides with the centenary of the publication of Schumpeter’s seminal work, The Theory of Economic Development (1911). The conference will be held in conjunction with the annual Innovation for Economic Development executive program.

Schumpeter’s intellectual legacy

Schumpeter left a rich intellectual legacy of relevance to emerging economies and globalization in general. He is associated with at least four major ideas (in writings between 1911 and 1942).”

Please read and note further :

“CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS

International Conference on

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION FOR GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT

Schumpeter and Polymer Research

3–5 June 2012

Harvard Kennedy School

Cambridge, MA

Co-organized by the

Science, Technology, and Globalization Project, Harvard Kennedy School

Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Agricultural Innovation in Africa Project, Harvard Kennedy School

Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Contact: katherine_gordon@hks.harvard.edu

Chaired by:

Professor Calestous Juma

Harvard Kennedy School

Background

The aim of the “International Conference on Innovation and Development” (3-5 June, 2012) is to take stock of the relevance of the work of Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter for developing countries. The conference coincides with the centenary of the publication of Schumpeter’s seminal work, The Theory of Economic Development (1911). The conference will be held in conjunction with the annual Innovation for Economic Development executive program.

Although Schumpeter’s work was clearly framed to address the unfolding nature of economic systems, policymakers and development thinkers in developing countries are only starting to be exposed to his seminal thinking. Many of these countries now embrace the idea of innovation in economic development without recognizing that they are furthering the legacy of Schumpeter.

For example, a 2005 report entitled Innovation: Applying Knowledge in Development played an important role in guiding discussions on the implementation of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. But few leaders in developing countries associated the ideas in the report with work on Schumpeter. The ideas in the report have been widely adopted among developing countries and prepared the ground for a commemorative study on Schumpeter’s legacy.

Schumpeter’s intellectual legacy

Schumpeter left a rich intellectual legacy of relevance to emerging economies and globalization in general. He is associated with at least four major ideas (in writings between 1911 and 1942). First, he highlighted the critical role that innovation (broadly defined plays in economic transformation), especially through the dynamic process of “creative destruction”. Secondly, argued that technological innovation as an integral part of the capitalist enterprise and not changes in resource endowment was possibly the most powerful driver of economic transformation. Thirdly, he postulated that expectation of monopoly power was a greater source of productivity than the mere act of being in a competitive market. Finally, he stressed the importance of history and outlined the institutional forces that influence the pace and direction of economic transformation. In a posthumous paper published in 2005 entitled, Development, Schumpeter provided the clearest articulation of the theory behind his evolutionary thinking.  He stressed the role of indeterminacy, novelty and discontinuous leaps.

Objectives

The aim of this conference is to convene a commemorative series of activities on the intellectual legacy of Schumpeter with specific reference to developing countries. Specific objectives of the initiative are to:

(a) outline the essential features of Schumpeter’s ideas of relevance to development policy and practice;

(b) elaborate the elements into a new study that lays out the policy implications of Schumpeter’s legacy for development policy and practice;

(c) explore the role of innovation in emerging engineering fields, specifically polymer research, in addressing development challenges such as agriculture, health, water, shelter and environmental management;

(d) disseminate the results among development policymakers, scholars, and practitioners; and

(e) identify new research directions on innovation and development.

The conference will also provide opportunities to authors to present findings in their recent books that build on Schumpeter’s ideas.

 

Indicative topics

Prospective contributors may submit abstracts on indicative topics provided below. The topics are only indicative and not intended to restrict the scope of submissions. Preference will be given to evidence-based papers that provide case studies of the role of innovation in development:

History and Theory

Innovation in development history

Innovation, entrepreneurship, and development

Innovation in Action

Product innovation

Process innovation

Market development

Natural resource utilization

Institutional innovation

Polymers, Innovation and Development

Advances in polymer research

Emerging applications

Implications for development

Governing Innovation

Innovation policy

New research and policy directions ”

via Science, Technology, and Globalization – Conference Announcements – Harvard – Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Posted May 1, 2012 by arnoneumann in Conference, Innovation

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Africa’s Chance to Leapfrog the West – Bright B. Simons – Harvard Business Review   Leave a comment

Leapfrogging is the umbrella name for the systems available to us today that make all this possible. Cloud computing, social media, new professional paradigms such as social entrepreneurship, below-the-line marketing and a host of novel realities have transformed the global context for Africans with their eyes set on continental and beyond-continental scale…..

…..Quite clearly, while leapfrogging might contribute powerfully to hacking physical infrastructure, it is less useful when it comes to soft (cultural, social, regulatory etc.) infrastructure. Therein lies its limitation in driving the African Renaissance.

So what is my one big idea?

Leapfrogging is a set of tools and techniques, not a conceptual or ideological description of the socioeconomic evolution of Africa now or in the near future. What matters is how entrepreneurs and innovators, especially social innovators, employ this set of tools within prevailing constraints. That, and not the poetic power of a renaissance motif, will transform Africa, one entrepreneurial triumph after another.”

via Africa’s Chance to Leapfrog the West – Bright B. Simons – Harvard Business Review.

Posted February 27, 2012 by arnoneumann in Africa, Innovation

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