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Mathemusician Vi Hart Explains Space-Time with a Music Box and a Möbius Strip | Brain Pickings   Leave a comment

Mathemusician Vi Hart Explains Space-Time with a Music Box and a Möbius Strip

by Maria Popova

“The fabric of the universe via backwards Bach.

If mathemusician Vi Hart — who for the past three years has been bringing whimsy to math with her mind-bending, playful, and illuminating stop-motion musical doodles — isn’t already your hero, she should be, and likely will be. (Cue in the GRAMMYs newly announced search for great music teachers.) In her latest gem, Hart uses music notation, a Möbius strip, and backwards Bach to explain space-time:

Music has two recognizable dimensions — one is time, and the other is pitch-space. … There [are] a few things to notice about written music: Firstly, that it is not music — you can’t listen to this. … It’s not music — it’s music notation, and you can only interpret it into the beautiful music it represents.

Also see Hart on the science of sound, frequency and pitch, and her blend of Victorian literature and higher mathematics to explain multiple dimensions.

For a decidedly less whimsical but enormously illuminating deeper dive, see these 7 essential books on time and watch Michio Kaku’s BBC documentary on the subject, then learn how to listen to music.”

via Mathemusician Vi Hart Explains Space-Time with a Music Box and a Möbius Strip | Brain Pickings.

AN : Just as the author , Maria Popova , writes of mathemusician Vi Hart  : “If mathemusician Vi Hart — ….- isn’t already your hero, she should be, and likely will . “….so you would be enamoured with the effervesent writings and curations of Maria through her site “BrainPickings.com ” . Absolutely a gem  of ideas, innovation and thought leadership !

Posted February 11, 2013 by arnoneumann in Mathamatics, music

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Akira Yoshizawa: Why origami matters – CSMonitor.com   Leave a comment

In 2000, when the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory wanted to design a telescope whose football-field sized lens could be folded into a small rocket, they approached an expert in a discipline not traditionally associated with aerospace and engineering: origami.

To be sure, Robert Lang, who has published 13 books on origami, also has degrees in engineering and physics and an extensive background in optics, but it was his expertise in folding paper that inspired the Eyeglass Telescope, whose thin plastic lens, designed to be forty times larger than that of the Hubble Space Telescope, would open like an umbrella in space.

Funding for the Eyeglass Telescope was discontinued before a full-scale version could be built, but the prototypes worked as predicted, showing that the Japanese art of paper folding has applications that go well beyond making paper cranes.

RELATED: Are you scientifically literate? Take our quiz!

As noted on Google’s home page, Wednesday marks the 101st birthday of Akira Yoshizawa, who is widely considered the grandfather of origami. He did not invent the practice – origami emerged as a pastime during Japan’s Heian period (794-1185). But in his lifetime, Yoshizawa did more than anyone else to elevate it into an art form. Equally important, Yoshizawa created a wordless notation consisting of lines, dashes, arrows, and diagrams that allowed people all over the world, regardless of their native language, to learn origami.    

And in doing so, he inspired generations of scientists and engineers to use origami principles for everything from noodle containers to domed stadium roofs. Look into the folds and creases of objects all around you and you’ll see origami everywhere……

via Akira Yoshizawa: Why origami matters – CSMonitor.com.

Posted March 19, 2012 by arnoneumann in Engineering, Origami

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